Exhibits database

In our database you will find all the exhibits currently on display in the exhibition. As preparation for your visit to Technorama, you can sort them by sectors and themes or simply browse through them.

Schliessen
Floor 1 | Mirrors in Mind

Experimental Stations 1 to 6

On a hexagonal table is a circus of hands-on activities, all to do with reflections in every-day life. E1: What’s in a surface? An object on a glass mirror actually ‘floats’ 1-2mm above its reflection. On a polished steel surface, it sits without floating, but the metal is easily scratched. The bronze plate is rather soft: the earliest Chinese and Greek mirrors were thin polished discs made of bronze. E2: Reflections off curved surfaces: Examine the ways the bright letter ‘F’ is reflected off curved glass when the reflecting surface is hemispheric, cylindrical, concave and convex. E3: Everyday curved mirrors: The car wing-mirror always shows an undistorted image, but its distance can be very deceptive. A shaving mirror shows up every facial blemish – just what you need but rarely want to see first thing in the morning! Look at yourself in the bowl of a spoon. What happens to your reflection on its convex back? Use the half cylinder and point-light to create a caustic curve: have you ever seen this in a teacup? E4: Polarisation: Polaroid sunglasses block horizontally-vibrating light. Two Poraloids, crossed, let through almost no light. Check the glare off glass and metal: from which is reflected light polarised? E5: Interference: The butterfly’s wing has a surface structure as fine as a diffraction grating. Depending on the angle of illumination, it is jewel bright (light reinforcing light – constructive interference) or dull aquamarine (light cancelling light – destructive interference). Interference patterns on banknotes and credit cards are so hard to reproduce it makes money and cards very hard to counterfeit. E6: Unwanted reflections: To prevent stray reflections off art-gallery masterpieces, anti-reflection glass can be used. One problem: shininess is lost too. By etching a reflective surface systematically, dull and shiny areas can be combined to decorative effect – think gift wrapping!

Floor 1 | Mirrors in Mind

Experimental Stations 1 to 6

On a hexagonal table is a circus of hands-on activities, all to do with reflections in every-day life. E1: What’s in a surface? An object on a glass mirror actually ‘floats’ 1-2mm above its reflection. On a ...

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Schliessen
Floor 1 | Mirrors in Mind

Kaleidoscope Experiments 1 to 6

Oversized toy or mathematical puzzle? Six kaleidoscope exhibits invite experiment, and reward with crystalline 3-D images. Each is equipped with a collection of translucent plastic shapes and sticks, to reveal the geometry around 1/3, 1/4 and 1/5 of 360°. There is a very pleasing perfection in symmetry! K1: 3 mirrors set at 120° from each other Use a stick to show 3 reflections at the point two mirrors touch: a neat 120° ‘Y’. Now make a cube, and a tetrahedron. K2: 3 mirrors at 90° Look into the kaleidoscope from any direction and you’ll find yourself at its apex! Use a stick to show 4 reflections at the point two mirrors touch: a right-angled ‘X’. And make an octahedron. This kaleidoscope is the familiar cat’s eye in the road: it reflects back into a driver’s eyes from whichever angle it’s viewed. K3: 3 mirrors at 72° A stick shows 5 reflections about the point two mirrors touch: a David’s star. Now make a regular pentagon; and a Platonic icosahedron. K4: 4 mirrors at 120° Construct a tetrahedron with a stick; a cube with a square shape. K5: two mirrors each at 120° and 90° Here is a game of parallelograms – a rhombic dodecahedron, to be precise, made of 12 diamond-shaped faces. A stick will show a cube and an octahedron. K6: two mirrors each of 120° and 72° With 5-fold symmetry at 72º and 3-fold symmetry at 120º you can make an icosahedron of triangles, or a dodecahedron of pentagons.

Floor 1 | Mirrors in Mind

Kaleidoscope Experiments 1 to 6

Oversized toy or mathematical puzzle? Six kaleidoscope exhibits invite experiment, and reward with crystalline 3-D images. Each is equipped with a collection of translucent plastic shapes and sticks, to reveal the ...

Learn more